Posts Tagged ‘shale’

Financing ‘frack addicts’ and shale producers in the US: Petrodollars

Robert Perkins examines the delicate balance act of financing shale oil production in the US in this week’s Oilgram News column, Petrodollars.

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The alphabet soup of oil patch recovery

The oil industry has always had buzz words and unique verbal shorthand. Remember the “Year of the MLP” (2007) and “Drill, Baby, Drill” (2008)?

During the last down cycle in 2008-2009, oil executives debated whether the recovery – when it came – would be “V”-shaped or “U”-shaped. That is, a relatively rapid bottoming of oil prices in the former instance, followed by a fairly quick rebound – or, alternatively, a steep falloff of oil prices, a plateau as the market got its bearings and settled out, and then a fairly rapid climb back up the price ladder.

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Quantifying the oversupply of US natural gas

This time a year ago, the United States produced about 66 Bcf/d of natural gas and the national average price of next-day delivered natural gas was $4.59/MMBtu. Today, the US is producing roughly 72 Bcf/d of natural gas and the average national price of next-day delivered gas, as of April 13, was $2.35/MMBtu. It is safe to say that we are in an environment of depressed prices and surplus supply.

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A shale gas wealth fund for northern England, but what about the south?

The UK’s Conservative party, running neck-to-neck in the polls with the Labour party ahead of the country’s May 7 general election, has released its 2015 manifesto. Among the commitments is a pledge to establish a shale gas wealth fund for the north of England.

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Petrodollars: Chinese investors second-guess Canadian oil projects

The trans-Pacific partnership of China and Canada promises to diversify product access for one of the biggest oil consumers in the world, but it also comes with problems, as Ashok Dutta explains in this week’s Oilgram News column, Petrodollars.

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As oil prices push towards $60/b, are we witnessing a “dead cat bounce”, or is the market finding some equilibrium?

On February 9 over 500 delegates crammed into London’s Mayfair Hotel for the Platts London Oil Forum 2015. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve attended this annual event, which traditionally kicks off IP Week – it’s a fantastic opportunity for the industry to come together, and invariably features stimulating debate.

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Guest post: A lesson from the history of oil

Steven Kopits is the president of Princeton Energy Advisors, and contributes guest posts to The Barrel. 

In an interview with Bloomberg TV, BP CEO Bob Dudley took a bearish view on the price of oil, noting that the present feels like 1986, when oil slumped from $30 a barrel to $10 and did not recover until in 1990. “The fundamental supply and demand does remind me of 1986 a bit, where we could go into a period in this decade of lower oil prices,” Dudley noted, adding that prices may stay in a range below $60 for as long as three years. “It will be a long time before we see $100 again.”

I agree with Dudley: 1986 is the appropriate template for today’s oil market dynamics. However, the understanding of the precedent is incomplete, and the analogy, imperfect. The differences matter.

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Energy Economist: Shale oil’s response to prices may call for industry re-evaluation

Shale oil’s investment cycle is shorter and its decline profile sharper than conventional oil production. Current indicators suggest legacy declines from shale will catch up fast with the industry. This points to a sharp deceleration in US shale oil output. But, while conventional oil takes time to slow down, it also takes time to speed up. It will be shale that is best placed to benefit from any oil price recovery, as Ross McCracken, managing editor of Platts Energy Economist, explains in this month’s selection from the publication. The full analysis can be found in the February 2015 issue, which is also issue 400 of Energy Economist.

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Has US oil production peaked? An EIA report argues both sides

Want to dazzle party guests this holiday season with a data-backed argument that the US oil boom may have peaked? Well, the US Energy Information Administration has a report you should probably read.

Want to shut up that obnoxious blowhard who keeps using EIA data to support his argument that the glory days of US oil may have gone by? Want some government data of your own to defend your claim that we have yet to see the peak of US oil production?

I have good news: You can use the same report.

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The Oil Big Five: Looking into the short future of 2014

The end of December is just around the corner, and it’s typical at this time of year for publications to take a grand look backward to sum up the year. What kind of proclamations can we make about the global oil industry in 2014? What sort of lessons are there to be learned, and how will we look back on 2014 years from now?

As tempting as it may be to take that look in the rearview mirror, today we’re going to look ahead with our December version of The Oil Big Five. By now you know the drill: We ask our Platts editors and analysts in offices around the globe what they think are the biggest issues or topics in the oil world for the upcoming month, and then we ask you for your thoughts. Are we right, are we wrong, and what do you want to see covered? Leave us your comments here or with #oilbig5 on Twitter.

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