Posts Tagged ‘prices’

Zooming out from current US steel woes shows a long slide

US buyers and sellers of steel have lots of time on their hands to study their predicament as the market remains in the doldrums, but gaining perspective could produce even more malaise.

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Long debate over diesel comes to a head after emissions scandal: Petrodollars

In this week’s Oilgram News column, Petrodollars, Robert Perkins looks at what the future of diesel for automobiles in Europe and beyond could be in the wake of a scandal that caused many to question whether gasoline has an opening to grab more fuel market share.

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Going for gold: London bullion market finds no clear path to increasing liquidity

The London bullion market is in a state of flux, with participants — ranging from bankers to brokers to exchanges — jostling to find out exactly what the other one wants in order for the market to evolve and fight off the increasing threat of business moving to Asia alongside mounting regulation.

The market is engaging behind closed doors to find out what it wants, but exactly what that is seems unclear to all involved.

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A Texas tale of two winds

It was a curious stretch of time for wind power generation in Texas.

From mid-August to mid-September, the availability of wind generation in the most heavily-stocked market did a virtual U-turn.

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On the road again: Why one of the US’ largest oil producers saw car traffic drop

What will get North Dakota drivers back on the road?

On Monday, the US Department of Transportation released its July 2015 Traffic Volume Trends, showing every state posting a year-over-year increase in vehicle miles traveled – except for one.

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The Panama Canal is leaking!? Eh…who cares, LNG trade seems to say

During routine testing of the expanded Panama Canal, engineers recently discovered some alarmingly large leaks in the new Cocoli Locks on the Pacific side, separating the middle and lower chambers. Despite the startling volume of water that can be seen cascading through what appears to be several meters of solid concrete, news of this development seems to have remained a secret. Alternatively, perhaps it’s just that no one actually cares.

According to the Panama Canal Authority, LNG tanker traffic is expected to reach 25 million metric tons per year upon completion of the expansion project. In recent years, LNG export project developers along the US Gulf Coast have been banking on an expanded canal for sales to Asia. Indeed, according to some estimates, the transit distance from the US Gulf Coast to Japan can be reduced to around 9,215 nautical miles, compared with 14,570 nautical miles through the Suez Canal.

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Russia’s oil industry woes also from within: Petrodollars

Russia’s oil and natural gas industry is feeling the impact of low prices and financial and technological sanctions, but disagreements within the country’s own energy sector are also proving a hurdle to development, as Rosemary Griffin details in this week’s Oilgram News column, Petrodollars.

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Waiting for Good Dough: A steel tragicomedy

Hank Steel, sitting on a low mound of trade publications, is trying to take off his wing-tip shoe without untying it, panting. He gives up, exhausted, tries again.

Enter Bobby Mallaferro.

HANK: (giving up again) Nothing to sell.

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Upstream oil execs agree: Low, long and living within means

The recent Barclays CEO Energy-Power Conference came at a crucial time in the current lower-for-longer oil price environment and clarified upstream CEOs’ plans to weather what could be 2015 all over again for a couple of more years.

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An uneasy union: how US steel and auto worker contract expirations led to industrial strife

America’s Labor Day was late this year, falling during the second week of September instead of the first. But that’s okay because anticipated big labor news was late as well.

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