Posts Tagged ‘power generation’

How could a ‘Brexit’ affect the European energy market?

The UK’s premier business lobbying organization, the CBI, has called on the business world to “turn up the volume” in the debate about the country’s relationship with Europe. A referendum is expected by 2017 to decide whether or not there should be a British exit (or “Brexit”) from the European Union. But how could this impact the electricity and gas market?

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Warming weather in California exposes vulnerabilities of wind power

Is it the first signs of a serious problem for wind power generation?

Data shows a significant drop-off of wind power sales in California due to warm weather, which caused a drop in wind velocities. Is it possible that wind farms that so many believe will help mitigate the warming of a changing climate will instead be impaired by that very same warming?

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IHS CERAWeek 2015, Day 4: Power ballad ending

Thursday is not the final day of IHS CERAWeek, but it is the final day focused on a particular commodity. It’s also Platts’ final day at CERAWeek this year. Thursday’s focus on electric power allows for a wide variety of topics, though, from coal to actual power generation to natural gas and everything in between.

We had two editors roaming the sessions Thursday, one to focus on coal and one to focus on electric power. Some of what we heard was shared from @PlattsPower, although @PlattsCoal, @PlattsGas and @PlattsOil also got some fodder from various officials sharing their plans. Just as a good power ballad has to come to an end, our coverage of this year’s CERAWeek is ending, and here are some thoughts from our editors about Thursday’s events.

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Guest post: Out of sight, out of mind? Vermont considers its renewables

John Kingston is president of The McGraw Hill Financial Global Institute and director of global market insights. He continues to observe energy markets after his many years with Platts.

There’s another growing kerfuffle in Vermont, which we’ve written about before as it tries to balance a seemingly impossible array of choices as it moves forward with its energy future. It’s a small state, but some of the conflicts there are sure to be duplicated in other parts of the US…and the world.

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Revenge of the renewables: How wind and solar play in Germany and Texas

Are big baseload power providers in Texas destined to suffer the same fate as their counterparts in Germany?

The question arises because Texas is once again undergoing a surge of wind generation installations at a time when wholesale power prices are already on the floor, and zero pricing due to existing wind generation is prevalent.

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Coal may burn bright, but which Asian market has the lights left on?

If you are a coal producer focused on the Chinese market, I am sure you will be scratching your head thinking about the future. Ever since China started imposing restrictions on imports, suppliers have gone on a wild hunt for buyers.

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Energy Economist: King Coal faces the end of its reign

The coal industry is in crisis. It has failed to recognize the structural shift in power generation driven by regulation rather than price and has missed the window of opportunity to invest in clean coal technologies. Now it faces a slow King Canute style demise, as elaborated by Ross McCracken, managing editor of Platts Energy Economist.

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Location, location, location: How much a 10 GW power gen retirement matters

Tucked in the recently released PJM Market Monitor annual report are a couple of tables showing that there will more than 10 GW of generation retired this year in the PJM footprint.

The conventional wisdom goes that 1 MW of power provides electricity to roughly 1,000 homes. So, if 10 GW are retired, then supposedly an estimated 10 million homes in the PJM footprint are going to be without power.

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The Niño comes strolling into the US Pacific Northwest power markets

Hydro generation is king in the Pacific Northwest, and to keep the turbines running, the region needs healthy stream flows.

Under normal circumstances, Mother Nature plays a critical role providing precipitation, particularly snowpack during winter. Then, come spring, ideally the region sees a nice, steady warm up in weather that gradually melts the snowpack, filling the rivers and reservoirs.

However, this winter is anything but normal as the Pacific Northwest has seen mostly warm weather.

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UK energy reform is not just about price cuts

The UK’s “big six” energy retailers have started to lower their gas prices, undercutting the opposition Labour party’s promise to freeze household energy bills if the party comes to power in the May 2015 general election. But the party’s plans go further than just its headline tariff freeze.

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