Posts Tagged ‘pipelines’

US Atlantic Coast crucial stronghold for rail and crude

Pipelines are chasing crude-by-rail shipments out of most US markets, but the Bakken-to-Atlantic-Coast route has managed to keep a hold on its market share, making the spread between domestic and international crudes more important than ever to profitability on the rails.

Rail used to have a key advantage in the midstream market; namely, it was already there. When the US started producing massive quantities of crude oil from shale wells about six years ago, the volumes quickly overwhelmed the market’s ability to move it around with traditional infrastructure. Huge amounts of crude oil were piling up in the Bakken, hundreds or even thousands of miles from the major coastal refining regions, and no one had the space to move it.

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Russia’s oil industry woes also from within: Petrodollars

Russia’s oil and natural gas industry is feeling the impact of low prices and financial and technological sanctions, but disagreements within the country’s own energy sector are also proving a hurdle to development, as Rosemary Griffin details in this week’s Oilgram News column, Petrodollars.

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Prospect of new pipeline capacity in Louisiana rattles rail, barge operators

Louisiana could be the site of the next wave of pipeline expansions, which might be a boon for refiners there, but other midstream players could find themselves on the outside looking in, depending on the origin of the crude on the lines.

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Oil pipeline threats add to pressure on Azerbaijan

Oil-rich Azerbaijan is being rattled by disruption and attacks on pipelines, highlighting its tough geopolitical position and adding to worries about falling oil prices.

Having been courted by previous US governments, international interest in Azerbaijan and fellow Caspian producer Kazakhstan has waned in recent years, not least because of the increase in US shale oil production. Azerbaijan’s oil production is, in any case, thought to have peaked.

But with 848,000 b/d of output last year, Azeri production still matters.

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Watching the dominoes fall for US steel

The domino theory in global politics — pertaining to the spread of communism, kids — is a thing of the past, but it is getting new life in the global steel arena — not the communism part, the domino part.

The most recent example in steel is a “double domino.”

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US crude-by-barge industry faces rough waters in oil markets: Petrodollars

While pipelines and rail are often the transportation modes that spring to mind for moving oil in the US, there’s also a market for inland barges. In this week’s Oilgram News column, Petrodollars, Joshua Mann assesses how the market to move oil has shifted under pressure from crude prices.

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Sussing out the ceilings over Russian gas prices

In this month’s selection from Platts Energy EconomistManaging Editor Ross McCracken explains what is currently contributing to Russia’s slipping grip on the European natural gas markets and questions whether Russian gas will be competitive in the future.

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Poll: Do you think the US will approve the Keystone XL pipeline?

With the end of the Obama administration in sight (or at least the 2016 presidential campaigns already making headlines), signs point toward a deadline on the Keystone XL decision.

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Canadian oil producers need to learn lessons from Keystone XL saga: New Frontiers

Canada is pursuing projects that will have a major impact not only on national production, but on the North American oil landscape as a whole, as Ashok Dutta explains in New Frontiers, this week’s Oilgram News column.

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The hearty, hardy gas production of the US

It seems like only yesterday that big winter storms or other extreme weather events could curtail or shut natural gas production in the US. A winter storm and freezing temperatures in the Northeast or in the Southeast would prompt freeze-offs or shut-ins along pipelines. But perhaps no longer.

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