Posts Tagged ‘OPEC’

OPEC cuts its oil output, and then Libya cuts it more

Platts completed its monthly survey of OPEC output in the last day or so, and then Libya decided to make all numbers from just a few days ago seem out-of-date.

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The Oil Big Five: Clear your calendar for November’s news

November didn’t waste any time with big news stories featuring oil issues, and some of us are still trying to catch up on the sleep lost watching the outcomes of the US elections on November 4. Looking ahead and around the globe, it appears the rest of the month has plenty of potential to keep us guessing as to what will happen to the global oil industry.

For this month’s The Oil Big Five, we’re marking our calendars for the rest of November and eagerly awaiting what new developments could start emerging. These five topics were suggested by our Platts editors and analysts around the world, and we’re particularly interested in what you think. Any wagers as to the outcome of any of these topics, or any other issues that are especially important to you? Comment here or on Twitter with the hashtag #oilbig5, and we’ll feature your comments (and give you another chance to leave us your thoughts) later in the month.

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The Oil Big Five: Your comments about oil prices worldwide

This is a busy time of year, and between conferences and the reporting of big news events, we’ve been running in several directions at once here at The Barrel. That’s part of the reason why we’re just now getting to your comments about the October version of The Oil Big Five, when we got our analysts and editors to share their biggest issues in the global oil industry.

Today, though, we want to highlight some of your comments. Remember you can always tell us your thoughts through a comment here on the blog, or on Twitter with the hashtag #oilbig5.

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Ed Morse and his team on the oil price slide

A few snippets from a conference call Ed Morse and his team at Citi held today on the decline in oil prices.

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More oil demand gloom from the IEA weighs on world’s producers

With crude prices at near four-year lows, the last thing the world’s key oil producers want to hear is that demand growth is set to weaken yet further.

But that was the message from the International Energy Agency in its latest monthly oil market report published today.

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A veteran economist looks at oil price collapses of yore, and sees parallels to today

Phil Verleger has a long memory.

Phil is a veteran energy economist, and he and I have been emailing each other over the course of the last week, recalling the oil price collapse of the mid 1980’s. As he noted, there are a dwindling number of of people still in the industry who remember that. But I had just joined Platts when the great collapse of 1985-1986 took place. On April 1, 1986, WTI plunged to less than $10 and no, it wasn’t an April Fool’s joke. (It remains the only day in the history of the WTI contract, launched in 1983, that the price ever “printed” a number less than double digits. It has never settled at less than $10.)

In his latest weekly report, Phil recalls that fall, as well as the collapse of 1998-1999. While WTI prices didn’t drop below the $10 level in the late 90’s, the levels of that period, after adjusting for inflation, were the lowest in history.

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Up or down in OPEC, its oil supply all comes back to the Saudis

Oil prices have found some support from the potential for lower production from OPEC next year, as suggested by the group’s secretary general, Abdalla el-Badri.

Speaking to Platts by telephone from Vienna earlier this week, Badri was at pains to stress that he was not predicting the outcome of OPEC’s next scheduled meeting on November 27. Nor was he talking about a 500,000 b/d reduction in the group’s current 30 million b/d ceiling. He was, he said, talking about an outlook that pegged the call on OPEC crude at 29.5 million b/d. He was not talking about a decision by OPEC.

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IEA again looks to OPEC to balance 2014 market

The International Energy Agency on Tuesday cut its oil demand growth forecast for 2014 for a number of reasons, not the least of which is a weaker global economic outlook than previously thought and lower oil supplies in the second quarter.

But even though the world won’t need as much oil this year as IEA earlier thought, that doesn’t mean it won’t need more crude from OPEC.

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Energy Economist: The amount of oil the world uses, seen through different eyes

Counting barrels is always tough to do, as Ross McCracken discusses in this month’s excerpt from Platts Energy Economist.

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IEA paints a steady picture for 2015 oil markets

The International Energy Agency on Friday gave its first taste of how oil markets might look in 2015, and on first reading it looks as though they should be pretty well supplied throughout the course of the year.

The agency’s confidence that non-OPEC supply can meet almost all of the projected growth in demand next year means that OPEC itself won’t need to produce, on average, any more than its current 30 million b/d ceiling. Read the rest of this entry »