Posts Tagged ‘China’

A tale of two crudes: Nigeria and Angola

Nigeria and Angola,  both situated on the west side of Africa, are two of biggest producers in the region, but the crudes from these two countries have treaded divergent paths in the past year, despite a lot of similarities.

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Deficit, surplus or balance: What are the real fundamentals of the global nickel market?

Global nickel market fundamentals have been troubling analysts recently with the market constantly forecast to be about to enter a significant deficit. However, this outlook never quite seems to materialize, leaving nickel prices drifting and failing to rally as expected on the back of a tighter market balance.

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New challenges for petrochemical players in China

At the recent Asia Petrochemical Industry Conference (APIC) held on May 7-8 at Seoul in South Korea, one of the hot topics doing the rounds was China’s march towards self-sufficiency. Will it, delegates asked, put a brake on petrochemical majors’ engagement with the country, which is currently the world’s largest consumer of chemicals?
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The Oil Big Five: Marking one year of watching the global oil industry

This month’s version of The Oil Big Five marks its first anniversary and we’re pleased to still be serving up a monthly dose of topics to keep an eye on in the global oil industry.

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European producers under pressure on softer aluminum ‘all-in’ price

Aluminum producers are expected to be under increasing pressure as the aluminum ‘all-in’ price (London Metal Exchange cash price + premium) has fallen over the last few months on the back of lower global premia, while the LME aluminum cash price has largely remained unchanged.

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How the LME’s warehouse reforms have played a key role in the fall of global aluminum premiums

This dramatic fall in global aluminum premia has taken the majority of market participants by surprise. However, there seems to be reluctance among market participants to identify recent London Metal Exchange warehouse reforms as having had much to do with the drop in regional premia.

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China’s thermal coal imports overstay their welcome

Ever had a house guest who has outstayed their welcome? It could be a family member, old school friend or acquaintance who has taken up residence in your house for longer than expected. They said they would stay only for a few days, then a week goes by and you begin to get impatient and frustrated. Politeness and your good manners keep you from broaching the subject of their stay. What to do?

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How falling commodity prices have flattered Chinese GDP in 2015

What’s in a number? Quite a lot when it comes to Chinese GDP.

Especially when it’s 7%, which was the real growth rate of the Chinese economy in the first quarter of 2015, compared to the first quarter of last year, according to the Chinese National Bureau of Statistics, who released this much-awaited data point on April 15.

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Chinese steelmaking ready for an April rebound?

The outlook for China’s steel market during April remained at similar levels to March, underpinned by expectations of stronger construction activity during China’s warmer spring months, according to the latest Platts China Steel Sentiment Index (Platts CSSI), which showed a headline reading of 74.7 out of a possible 100 points.

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The Oil Big Five: Taking stock at the end of Q1

There are a couple months of the year that seem busier than others, and April is one in the oil industry. The first quarter has ended, and many of the editors here at Platts are readying themselves for the slew of earnings calls and reports that will be coming soon. Those quarterly updates can sometimes signal big changes – announcements about new projects, financial doings, production figures, etc. – and we wanted to assess the global oil industry now, in the calm before the storm.

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