Archive for the ‘renewable energy’ Category

IHS CERAWeek 2015, Day 4: Power ballad ending

Thursday is not the final day of IHS CERAWeek, but it is the final day focused on a particular commodity. It’s also Platts’ final day at CERAWeek this year. Thursday’s focus on electric power allows for a wide variety of topics, though, from coal to actual power generation to natural gas and everything in between.

We had two editors roaming the sessions Thursday, one to focus on coal and one to focus on electric power. Some of what we heard was shared from @PlattsPower, although @PlattsCoal, @PlattsGas and @PlattsOil also got some fodder from various officials sharing their plans. Just as a good power ballad has to come to an end, our coverage of this year’s CERAWeek is ending, and here are some thoughts from our editors about Thursday’s events.

Read the rest of this entry »

Guest post: Out of sight, out of mind? Vermont considers its renewables

John Kingston is president of The McGraw Hill Financial Global Institute and director of global market insights. He continues to observe energy markets after his many years with Platts.

There’s another growing kerfuffle in Vermont, which we’ve written about before as it tries to balance a seemingly impossible array of choices as it moves forward with its energy future. It’s a small state, but some of the conflicts there are sure to be duplicated in other parts of the US…and the world.

Read the rest of this entry »

Revenge of the renewables: How wind and solar play in Germany and Texas

Are big baseload power providers in Texas destined to suffer the same fate as their counterparts in Germany?

The question arises because Texas is once again undergoing a surge of wind generation installations at a time when wholesale power prices are already on the floor, and zero pricing due to existing wind generation is prevalent.

Read the rest of this entry »

Guest post: A driving force behind the Low Carbon Fuel Standard sees credit prices rising

John Kingston is President of the McGraw Hill Financial Global Institute and Director of Global Market Insights. He continues to observe energy markets after his many years with Platts.

The price of Low Carbon Fuel Standard credits is going to rise. It’s just a question of when.

Read the rest of this entry »

UK election kicks off an uncertain period for energy investors

The UK’s general election kicked off Monday with the official closure of parliament, heralding 38 days of campaigning ahead of the May 7 vote. With clear policy differences between the parties and the polls too-close-to-call, energy investors could be set for an uncertain year ahead.

Read the rest of this entry »

US EPA pleads for some RFS understanding

Attendees of the National Ethanol Conference in suburban Dallas last week who were hoping to hear, at long last, what biofuels volumes the US Environmental Protection Agency would require in the overdue 2014 and 2015 Renewable Fuel Standards likely left disappointed.

Read the rest of this entry »

US ethanol shrugs off its RFS local difficulties to embrace the world

For those ethanol producers outside of the US, the subtitle of the Renewable Fuels Association’s National Ethanol Conference — “Going Global” — is likely to unleash ripples of unease across their industry. Far from reeling from a perceived loss of support in the face of government hesitation and collapsing crude oil prices, the US ethanol sector is enjoying an upbeat gathering deep in the heart of Texas.

Read the rest of this entry »

Why wind farms were not to blame for ‘spiral’ seal deaths

It was one of the mysteries of summer 2010: what was responsible for the strange deaths of grey seals off the picturesque north Norfolk coast of England, many with horrific “corkscrew” or “spiral” cut marks? New research suggests wind farms were not to blame, despite some suggestions at the time.

Dozens of seals had been found washed up on England’s east coast with the distinctive wound pattern. Reports said some 38 dead seals were found at Blakeney Point, 12 miles from the Sheringham Shoal wind farm then under construction.

A number of possible causes were proposed, but one of the top theories discussed at the time was whether the seals could have been caught up in the propellers of the increased boat traffic to and from local harbors as developers put up the turbines offshore.

Read the rest of this entry »

California’s cap-and-trade no more than road bump in gasoline’s steep price decline

Drivers in car-crazed California paid more than 10% more for their gasoline at the start of the year. They just didn’t realize it.

As expected, California’s introduction of the emissions cap-and-trade program for transportation fuel suppliers boosted Los Angeles regular gasoline rack prices nearly 17 cents in the first two days of 2015 to $1.5885/gal. The rack is the wholesale level where gasoline and diesel is moved onto those often-shiny tanker trucks that hold roughly 9,000 gallons.

What barely changed right away was the price up and down the supply chain.

Read the rest of this entry »

Egypt’s Sisi outlines national energy policy at World Future Energy Summit

Egypt has set development and reform of its energy sector as a key priority as it seeks to rebuild its economy following the country’s second revolution in the past few years, the country’s president, Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi, said January 19 during his first official visit to the UAE in that role.

During his keynote address to the World Future Energy Summit in Abu Dhabi, Sisi also said he considered the security of the Persian Gulf region to be “part and parcel of Egyptian security.” The annual Abu Dhabi WFES gathering, while primarily a UAE forum for promoting and discussing regional and international renewable energy development, has also developed a significant political agenda.

Read the rest of this entry »