Archive for the ‘oil fundamentals’ Category

Mexico’s landmark oil lease sale results disappoint

Mexico’s first upstream auction in 77 years proved to be a disappointment July 16, with the award of just two of the 14 blocks on offer. After months of highly promoted conferences and publicity following last year’s energy reform, the weak response came as a surprise.

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Iran nuclear deal impact on oil markets

Iran’s oil and financial sanctions will be lifted with a phased deal struck on its nuclear program on July 14, but the market won’t immediately see more crude. The country is currently exporting around 1 million b/d of crude, less than half the 2.2 million-2.3 million b/d exported before the European Union and US imposed crippling oil and financial sanctions in mid-2012.

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In the maelstrom of oil price news, has bias triggered trading mistakes? Petrodollars

In this week’s Oilgram News column, Petrodollars, Ned Molloy asks the question, have emotions and confirmation bias triggered trading mistakes in the maelstrom of oil price news?

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The Oil Big Five: Waiting for June’s big oil news announcements

There are certain months that have obvious potential for big news, and June looks like one of them. November 2014 was another one, and this month’s iteration of The Oil Big Five follows up on many of the themes that were raised then.

We reached out to Platts oil editors and analysts worldwide to see what they were keeping an eye on in June, and these topics came back as immediate responses. We hope you’re tracking them as well, and be sure to leave us a comment and let us know your thoughts on the issues below or on Twitter, using the hashtag #oilbig5. If you’re not as concerned about these topics, then let us know what you are watching and what we should be watching as well.

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The alphabet soup of oil patch recovery

The oil industry has always had buzz words and unique verbal shorthand. Remember the “Year of the MLP” (2007) and “Drill, Baby, Drill” (2008)?

During the last down cycle in 2008-2009, oil executives debated whether the recovery – when it came – would be “V”-shaped or “U”-shaped. That is, a relatively rapid bottoming of oil prices in the former instance, followed by a fairly quick rebound – or, alternatively, a steep falloff of oil prices, a plateau as the market got its bearings and settled out, and then a fairly rapid climb back up the price ladder.

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Guest post: A driving force behind the Low Carbon Fuel Standard sees credit prices rising

John Kingston is President of the McGraw Hill Financial Global Institute and Director of Global Market Insights. He continues to observe energy markets after his many years with Platts.

The price of Low Carbon Fuel Standard credits is going to rise. It’s just a question of when.

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No demand response to crude price crash? ‘Show us the money’ say motorists in India and China

Crude oversupply is a well-known story by now. Let’s talk about demand growth – or the absence of it. Why has the near-60% crash in crude as measured between the high of mid-June 2014 and the trough of January this year ($115.06 and $46.59/b respectively for front-month Brent) not produced a demand response from Asia?

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The price of oil reaffirms the lesson of a legendary wager

John Kingston is President of the McGraw Hill Financial Global Institute and Director of Global Market Insights. He continues to observe energy markets after his many years with Platts.

When you look at a chart of the price of oil during the last six months, it says a lot of things. One of them is that Julian Simon has won again.

I’d long known about the legendary Julian Simon-Paul Ehrlich bet, made in the early 1980’s at the tail end of a commodity boom. What I didn’t know, until I recently stumbled upon an academic paper written by Yale professor Paul Sabin from 2013 that was turned into a book called The Bet, was how much the two of them truly despised each other. Why I thought the bet was sort of friendly is a mystery; it was actually part of a long-standing open hostility.

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As oil prices push towards $60/b, are we witnessing a “dead cat bounce”, or is the market finding some equilibrium?

On February 9 over 500 delegates crammed into London’s Mayfair Hotel for the Platts London Oil Forum 2015. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve attended this annual event, which traditionally kicks off IP Week – it’s a fantastic opportunity for the industry to come together, and invariably features stimulating debate.

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California’s cap-and-trade no more than road bump in gasoline’s steep price decline

Drivers in car-crazed California paid more than 10% more for their gasoline at the start of the year. They just didn’t realize it.

As expected, California’s introduction of the emissions cap-and-trade program for transportation fuel suppliers boosted Los Angeles regular gasoline rack prices nearly 17 cents in the first two days of 2015 to $1.5885/gal. The rack is the wholesale level where gasoline and diesel is moved onto those often-shiny tanker trucks that hold roughly 9,000 gallons.

What barely changed right away was the price up and down the supply chain.

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