Archive for the ‘natural gas’ Category

Petrodollars: The Western Canadian LNG business attempts to launch

 Exports of LNG from the US aren’t the only potential growth story for North America. LNG shipments out of Western Canada are also on tap. Ashok Dutta, in this week’s Oilgram News column Petrodollars, reviews the start-and-go status of the various projects.

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East Africa must avoid LNG delays to compete with rivals

Mozambique and Tanzania are locked in a race to be first to export gas from East Africa, so much so that the region may emerge as a strong competitor to Qatar and Australia in the battle to capture key export markets in Asia.

Geographically, East Africa is ideally placed to supply LNG to Japan, China, India and South-East Asia all of whom rely heavily on LNG imports.

LNG from East Africa should be cheaper than from Australia but such an advantage may be wiped out if Mozambique and Tanzania are unable to develop their potential before a glut of other new supplies depress prices.

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Gas Daily: Colorado’s anti-fracking ballot initiative fizzles out…for now

After some local areas of Colorado last year passed fracking bans of dubious legality — that sort of thing is generally the responsibility of the state, not a city or town — there arose a clamor for an initiative that would give localities that power. It was seen as a way to severerly limit fracking throughout the state.

It was such a hot-button issue that Democrats in the state were concerned that the issue could create rifts in the party. But all that fretting was for naught; the issue won’t be on the ballot in November.

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The changing face of global gas, or, chasing the arbitrage

The fate of US LNG import terminal projects was sealed as the amount of relatively low-cost gas produced onshore soared in the middle of the last decade. Most of them were scrapped before getting off the drawing board, but the more advanced of them, notably Cheniere’s Sabine Pass, went on to become export terminals, in a radical and apparently successful bid to salvage their backers’ fortunes.

That well-documented transformation was only made possible by the yawning price difference opening up between the depressed Henry Hub and the rest of the world.

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“Mini-trends” increasingly common in the oil industry

In the talk about oil cycle phases, one pattern that has emerged in recent years is the appearance of “mini-trends” within the industry that are often at odds with what is happening in the larger market.

As a result, data is growing increasingly complex, and even single data sets contain a “story-behind-the-story” which often makes more complete interpretations necessary and keeps journalists and researchers busy “Deciphering It All.”

Case in point — one of many — is the offshore industry which is undergoing a slump in dayrates, particularly for deep- and ultra-deep waters, while the onshore sector — which at least in the US and increasingly overseas now consists of unconventional drilling — churns ever-higher amid what is generally agreed to be a larger, unprecedented boom.

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The Latin American quandary: lots of shale gas, not a lot of production

Imports of liquefied natural gas to Latin American are up 18% so far this year, according to Bentek, a unit of Platts, buoyed by growing demand from Mexico and Brazil. But, with so much recoverable indigenous supply, why is Latin America paying top dollar for imported gas?

According to the US Energy Information Administration, technically recoverable shale gas resources in Argentina are the second largest globally at 802 trillion cubic feet, Mexico’s reserves are the sixth largest at 545 Tcf, while Brazil ranks tenth with reserves estimated at 245 Tcf.

Accessing these shale reserves requires political will and costly investments, factors that have combined in various ways across the region to impede domestic production and make LNG an easy, though short-sighted solution to growing demand for electricity in Latin America.

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At the Wellhead: Indonesia tries to kickstart its faltering oil industry

The dwindling fortunes of Indonesia’s energy outlook is forcing the country to take radical steps to change its future. Mriganka Jaipuriyar, in this week’s Oilgram News column At the Wellhead, reviews some of the shifts the country is taking to overcome earlier bureaucratic hurdles.

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Energy Economist: Why do oil and natural gas markets appear complacent?

In this month’s selection on The Barrel from Platts’ Energy Economist, Ross McCracken wonders why in the midst of so much turmoil, markets are relatively calm.

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A city in the heart of the Marcellus and its tortoise-like economic growth rate

IHS Global Insight teamed up with the US Conference of Mayors to produce a report looking back at the growth rates of US metropolitan areas. It also looks forward to 2020 and projects growth rates through that year.

Sitting at the top of the forward-looking list is Midland, Texas. Anybody familiar with the oil industry doesn’t need an explanation why the Midland-Odessa area is at the top of the heap. The production explosion in the Permian Basin has made it a boomtown once again.

The report projects annual average economic growth of 5.8% through 2020. That’s a full point better than Greeley, Colorado, which is in second place. And Greeley isn’t far from the Niobrara formation in that state.

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Letter from the IAEE meeting: competitive response

To visit an energy conference in New York, or perhaps anywhere in the United States, is to feel the full force of the shale gale that has swept across the US oil and gas industry, transforming the country’s domestic and foreign perspectives. Its founding fathers have achieved legendary status and are provided the veneration that only America appears capable of giving business leaders.

Shale is variously described as a “revolution,” even a “miracle.” Benjamin Schlesinger, president of Benjamin Schlesinger and Associates, went that one step further to state that “natural gas is a renewable fuel.”

This was the international conference of the International Association for Energy Economics held in New York from June 15-18, where it was clear that America is the cat that has got the cream. It is the crucible of the revolution in drilling technology that has reduced the cost of previously unrecoverable oil and gas resources to affordable levels, and it is beginning to export those technologies to the rest of the world. It no longer has to concern itself with existing and emerging import dependencies. Instead it is discussing the possibility that it may soon be a net exporter of oil.

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