Archive for the ‘exploration’ Category

Regulation & Environment: Alaska mining battle and its impact on oil and gas

Regulations between mining and oil and gas often spill over. That’s what the industry is worried about in Alaska, as Tim Bradner discusses in this week’s Oilgram News column, Regulation & Environment.

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New Frontiers: Cutting back natural gas flaring in North Dakota hits a bump

North Dakota has aggressively sought to cut the amount of natural gas flaring going on in the state. It’s made strides, but it has a new hurdle, as Brian Scheid discusses in this week’s Oilgram News column, New Frontiers.

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Mexican LNG exports will not come soon

Recent reports say Japan wants to import LNG from Mexico after 2020. While Mexico could add liquefaction facilities at one or more of its three LNG import terminals, it would need to overcome some hurdles before it could export LNG.

Sempra’s Energia Costa Azul terminal on the Pacific Coast of northern Baja California rarely imports cargoes, but the hurdle for exports from Costa Azul would be access to gas. This import terminal would not have been built 15 miles north of Ensenada if there had been enough gas production nearby to meet demand.

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Peace agreement in gas-rich Mozambique sets the stage for elections

After two years of sporadic clashes, Mozambique’s Frelimo government and Renamo, the main opposition party signed a peace agreement in August, improving prospects for the October elections in the gas-rich southern African nation.

The presidential and parliamentary elections on October 15 will mark the end of president Armando Guebuza’s second and final term in office.

The election takes place as Mozambique becomes an attractive investment destination following huge gas discoveries by Italy’s Eni and US’ Anadarko. The discoveries, estimated at 100 trillion cubic feet have the potential to transform Mozambique into one of the world’s leading LNG exporters.

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Regulation & Environment: Reading into the big BP Macondo decision

Gary Gentile, in this week’s Oilgram News Column Regulation & Environment, looked at the lengthy decision by a federal judge in the big civil action surrounding the Deepwater Horizon blowout.

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The great new oil and gas frontier of Myanmar, warts and all

Myanmar, the Southeast Asian country still called Burma by many people, is rapidly emerging from almost 50 years of military rule and related economic isolation.

The country, which is slightly smaller than Texas and home to more than 50 million people of many ethnicities, religions and language groups, has great potential. Apart from known and hoped-for oil and gas resources the country also has substantial tin, zinc, copper, tungsten, lead and coal resources, as well as jade, other gemstones and hardwoods.

A few days spent in the former capital Yangon earlier this month proved a real eye opener. Those five decades of isolation have led to a many idiosyncrasies and problems, making it a struggle for most foreign investors to do business there.

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China hails new deepwater natural gas find, done all on its own

China National Offshore Oil Corp. has plenty to get excited about these days. After years of touting the unexplored and hidden depths of the South China Sea, the company has finally scored a coup with its first independent deepwater discovery.

The company earlier this week announced the success of the Lingshui 17-2-1 wildcat well, hailing it as a major breakthrough in exploration efforts.

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Utica shale’s big natural gas flows, and Edvard Munch

Did you ever feel like that kid in the poster for the classic movie “Home Alone” who is clutching his face with both hands, mouth agape in shock at having to foil two nitwit burglars?

I did when I saw the initial natural gas production rates that have come out of some recent Utica Shale wells.  Although it wasn’t out of shock but sheer awe at the volumes being yielded by wells the Northeast US natural gas-prone play.

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Scotland independence vote sets North Sea oil industry on edge

Scotland’s independence vote has received a last-minute jolt of energy as polls show a surge by the Nationalist camp, which has effectively countered a mostly downbeat “No” campaign and picked holes in London’s claims to be a responsible custodian of North Sea oil.

A week ahead of the September 18 referendum and with oil remaining a major issue, pro-Union politicians and the financial community in London have been alarmed by polls showing the Nationalists level-pegging, after months in which the “Better Together” camp had a comfortable lead.

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The north of Australia is getting some oil and gas exploration attention

Australia’s ongoing offshore exploration success — Santos last week announced another gas discovery in the prolific Browse basin — has seen the vast country’s largely-untapped onshore resources overlooked by many.

Some of the country’s unconventional resources — notably Queensland’s coal seam gas fields in the east of the country — have been known about and developed for years, while others such as the Cooper Basin, in east-central Australia, have attracted significant investor attention of late, notably from US major Chevron.

But delegates at the 20th South East Asia Australia Offshore & Onshore Conference last week, held in the booming northern port city of Darwin, heard about less well known, but equally promising, onshore basins such as South Bonaparte, MacArthur and Carolina.

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