Archive for the ‘emissions’ Category

I’ve got a fever, and the only prescription is more wind generation

The projected big winner in the Environmental Protection Agency’s pursuit of reduced carbon dioxide emissions by the power sector is wind generation.

The EPA’s Clean Power Plan, whose rules were unveiled Monday, is expected to trigger a boom in wind installations that could amount to a 63% increase in wind generation by the year 2020 over 2013 wind capacity totals, and an increase of 211% by 2030.

Read the rest of this entry »

WGC 2015: How gas hopes to fight back against coal

Visitors from around the world queue expectantly on the Paris streets, waiting to pass through bag searches and metal detectors to enter the show within. No, it’s not the French Open at Roland Garros, but the big event at the other end of town, the 26th edition of the World Gas Conference, taking place in the French capital all this week.

Read the rest of this entry »

Company surviving the ‘coaldrums’ by gasifying coal

Coal is being overwhelmed by regulation and supplanted by subsidized competitors. Patriot Coal is the latest US producer to come off the rails, and thousands of miles away in country that not so long ago was building a coal-fired plant a week, Chinese coal producer Shenhua has also reported poor financials. Yet one firm, SinoCoking Coal, has embraced coal gasification and, in the midst of the ‘coaldrums,’ has reported a huge rise in income. Ross McCracken has more from the most recent selection from Platts Energy Economist.

Read the rest of this entry »

Holy Carbon: Does the Pope’s view matter in the fight against climate change?

Pope Francis is set to weigh in on the climate change debate in what has already caused a considerable buzz in the media, by equal measure prompting cheers from the green lobby and irritation among climate skeptics, even before the message has been released.

Read the rest of this entry »

Guest post: A driving force behind the Low Carbon Fuel Standard sees credit prices rising

John Kingston is President of the McGraw Hill Financial Global Institute and Director of Global Market Insights. He continues to observe energy markets after his many years with Platts.

The price of Low Carbon Fuel Standard credits is going to rise. It’s just a question of when.

Read the rest of this entry »

Crunch time for EU carbon market reform: time for compromise?

What happens when an irresistible force meets an immovable object? One answer to this paradox is “nothing” since irresistible forces and immovable objects can’t co-exist. At least not in the real world.

But what happens when the irresistible force is the political will of the European Union to reform its carbon market ahead of global climate talks later this year, and the immovable object is a group of EU member states who are resolutely opposed to higher carbon prices?

Read the rest of this entry »

Regulation & Environment: California as a carbon testing ground

In the US, state attempts to cut down on carbon have raised worries about fuel availability, costs and timelines. Herman Wang explains more in this week’s Oilgram News column, Regulation & Environment.

Read the rest of this entry »

California’s cap-and-trade no more than road bump in gasoline’s steep price decline

Drivers in car-crazed California paid more than 10% more for their gasoline at the start of the year. They just didn’t realize it.

As expected, California’s introduction of the emissions cap-and-trade program for transportation fuel suppliers boosted Los Angeles regular gasoline rack prices nearly 17 cents in the first two days of 2015 to $1.5885/gal. The rack is the wholesale level where gasoline and diesel is moved onto those often-shiny tanker trucks that hold roughly 9,000 gallons.

What barely changed right away was the price up and down the supply chain.

Read the rest of this entry »

Energy Economist: Trying to make CO2 have an application, rather than just getting rid of it

CO2 in your mattress? Not a great selling point, but it should be. There is a strong possibility that in the next few years some materials currently derived from fossil fuels will have a growing proportion of CO2 derived from the waste flues of industrial processes embedded within the chemical backbone of the polymers used to make them. This represents one of the first steps in creating a closed and sustainable carbon economy. Ross McCracken, the editor in chief of Platts Energy Economist, looks at that possibility in this month’s selection from that publication.

Read the rest of this entry »

New Frontiers: Cutting back natural gas flaring in North Dakota hits a bump

North Dakota has aggressively sought to cut the amount of natural gas flaring going on in the state. It’s made strides, but it has a new hurdle, as Brian Scheid discusses in this week’s Oilgram News column, New Frontiers.

Read the rest of this entry »