Archive for the ‘electric power’ Category

US data indicates power sector CO2 emissions down 15.6% since 2007

As it prepares for the November 30 start-up of the United Nations Climate Change conference in Paris, the US Department of Energy has been generating data that shows total US carbon dioxide emissions have declined and then flattened out in the past eight years, with emissions specifically from the US power sector part of the same trend.

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Look to Mexico for some of the best oil market story lines through 2020

“Reform” is one of those words that means anything you want it to mean. It’s been deployed in so many political fights, it has really lost its meaning in most contexts. I suppose some people still say a teen car thief is sent off to “reform school,” but I doubt it.

Here in Mexico City, that word is loaded. I’m writing this 12 floors up from the Paseo de la Reforma, the grand boulevard named for the civil war between liberals and conservatives here in the 1850s and 1860s.

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Halloween comes early to ERCOT

Two days before Halloween and as most of the New York Mets’ bats continued to show lifelessness in the World Series, news of a rabies-infected bat brought a timely dose of fear and humor to Electric Reliability Council of Texas stakeholders.

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Why US natural gas prices hit multi-year lows this week

On Oct. 29, 2015, the NYMEX November natural gas futures contract settled at $2.033/MMBtu.

For comparison, the November contract closed at $3.649/MMBtu in 2014, $1.61 higher or 79 percent higher than Oct. 29. The last time the prompt-month contract closed lower than Oct. 29 was April 24, 2012 at $1.975/MMBtu.

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Infographic: Japan’s nuclear restart

Japan’s fleet of 43 nuclear reactors, with a total installed capacity of about 42,000 MW, has been largely idled since September 2013, when the country adopted stricter nuclear safety requirements in the wake of the Fukushima I accident.

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Analysts, aluminum buyers mull impact of Chinese petcoke crackdown

China’s amended Air Pollution and Control Law includes a restriction on the import, sale or use of higher-sulfur petroleum coke, which is likely to tighten supply of anode-grade petcoke for the aluminum industry, according to analysts.

Petroleum coke is a byproduct of oil refining, and about 80% of global production is considered fuel-grade, used for generating electricity and in the cement industry. The remaining 20% is calcined, or further refined, and serves as a key ingredient in other manufacturing ─ in particular, aluminum production. Calcined pet coke (CPC) is used to make the anodes that provide the carbon for the electrolytic chemical reaction during aluminum smelting.

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A Texas tale of two winds

It was a curious stretch of time for wind power generation in Texas.

From mid-August to mid-September, the availability of wind generation in the most heavily-stocked market did a virtual U-turn.

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Paris climate talks: What can be expected from COP21 (Part 3 of 3)

Europe, the US and China have all submitted their plans to the UN ahead of the Paris talks, detailing greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets and measures to achieve them.

While the big players are getting serious on emissions reductions, there are still potential sticking points in the negotiations.

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Paris climate talks: China and the US hold the keys (Part 2 of 3)

So what’s changed in the six years since Copenhagen? A lot, it turns out.

The world has moved on from outmoded country definitions of “developing” which grouped fast-developing economies like China alongside much poorer nations including many of those in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

There is now a much wider acceptance among governments that everyone has to pull their weight, while respecting common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities. Governments have crossed the battle lines and are looking for workable solutions, instead of fighting over who’s to blame, the World Bank said in May.

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Data downpour to reveal all in EU gas and power markets

EU energy regulators are about to find out what really goes on in the wholesale gas and electricity markets, as a new trade reporting obligation starts on October 7. This is a huge step toward more transparent markets, but what will regulators do with the data?

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