Archive for the ‘electric power’ Category

Analysts, aluminum buyers mull impact of Chinese petcoke crackdown

China’s amended Air Pollution and Control Law includes a restriction on the import, sale or use of higher-sulfur petroleum coke, which is likely to tighten supply of anode-grade petcoke for the aluminum industry, according to analysts.

Petroleum coke is a byproduct of oil refining, and about 80% of global production is considered fuel-grade, used for generating electricity and in the cement industry. The remaining 20% is calcined, or further refined, and serves as a key ingredient in other manufacturing ─ in particular, aluminum production. Calcined pet coke (CPC) is used to make the anodes that provide the carbon for the electrolytic chemical reaction during aluminum smelting.

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A Texas tale of two winds

It was a curious stretch of time for wind power generation in Texas.

From mid-August to mid-September, the availability of wind generation in the most heavily-stocked market did a virtual U-turn.

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Paris climate talks: What can be expected from COP21 (Part 3 of 3)

Europe, the US and China have all submitted their plans to the UN ahead of the Paris talks, detailing greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets and measures to achieve them.

While the big players are getting serious on emissions reductions, there are still potential sticking points in the negotiations.

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Paris climate talks: China and the US hold the keys (Part 2 of 3)

So what’s changed in the six years since Copenhagen? A lot, it turns out.

The world has moved on from outmoded country definitions of “developing” which grouped fast-developing economies like China alongside much poorer nations including many of those in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

There is now a much wider acceptance among governments that everyone has to pull their weight, while respecting common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities. Governments have crossed the battle lines and are looking for workable solutions, instead of fighting over who’s to blame, the World Bank said in May.

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Data downpour to reveal all in EU gas and power markets

EU energy regulators are about to find out what really goes on in the wholesale gas and electricity markets, as a new trade reporting obligation starts on October 7. This is a huge step toward more transparent markets, but what will regulators do with the data?

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Paris climate talks: Why this time is different (Part 1 of 3)

Heads of state and senior diplomats from almost 200 countries are set to gather in Paris in December to agree for the first time a fully comprehensive global climate protection deal. They have failed many times before, so why should they succeed this time?

The answer is because almost everything has changed: the climate science is more certain; governments are more confident on the need for action; climate denial is on the way out in most countries; the financial markets are paying attention to carbon risk; evidence is showing that emissions and economic growth can successfully be decoupled; the cost of renewable energy is falling; and several of the major oil and gas companies are calling for a global carbon price.

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I’ve got a fever, and the only prescription is more wind generation

The projected big winner in the Environmental Protection Agency’s pursuit of reduced carbon dioxide emissions by the power sector is wind generation.

The EPA’s Clean Power Plan, whose rules were unveiled Monday, is expected to trigger a boom in wind installations that could amount to a 63% increase in wind generation by the year 2020 over 2013 wind capacity totals, and an increase of 211% by 2030.

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Banks see second quarter revenue dip from commodities

Pinning down the financial performance of energy commodity trading at top financial institutions is complicated by the manner in which banks segment their operations and lump together certain revenue numbers.

While differences exist from bank to bank, for the most part the big banks place commodity trading within their fixed-income unit of their investment bank division. Low commodity prices, less volatility, and thus lower volumes traded, have all had an impact.

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Burn, baby, burn: North American natural gas gets ahead in generation

All over the news last week, media outlets highlighted a June US Energy Information Administration report that showed that for the first time ever, the US generated more electricity from natural gas than from coal in April. EIA data said the US generated 92.5 TWh from natural gas and 88.8 TWh from coal. This is the first time ever that any fuel source produced more electricity than coal. Although this might be a temporary blip (winter demand will send coal’s numbers past natural gas), it is still a huge deal.

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Natural gas becalmed as wind blows ahead in European power

Roll over Chicago, welcome to Europe: the Windy Continent.

In just 10 years’ time, wind is forecast to overtake natural gas as the biggest single power generation source by installed capacity in Europe.

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