Colonial Pipeline is turning some in US gasoline market into history buffs

A new oil commodity with a clunky name began grabbing headlines this spring: Colonial Pipeline shipper history. Here’s the history of this so-called history, and why it’s likely to stick around after this summer’s tan lines are long faded.

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US oil exports seen as key to security: Regulation and Environment

There’s an economic argument to be made for lifting US crude oil export restrictions, and then there’s the argument that American oil could go a long way toward providing security to the US and its allies. Brian Scheid explains in this week’s Oilgram News column, Regulation and Environment.

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Take The “A” Train…or not: New York subway hit by metals theft

New York subway riders trying to take jazz musician Billy Strayhorn’s advice and travel on the “A” train into Manhattan ran into a snag this week.

Services along the whole 31-mile length of the “A” train route were disrupted May 27 by what the Metropolitan Transit Authority described as a “massive theft of copper cable” from subway line tracks near Howard Beach, Queens.

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UK utilities higher charges for pre-payment meters is not the ‘smart’ option

I’d like to draw a positive parallel between pre-payment meters and smart meters.

That sounds facetious and in some ways it is. Rightly or wrongly, it seems pre-payment meters have become symbolic in the UK of poor families and intransigent tenants on Benefits Street.

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How could a ‘Brexit’ affect the European energy market?

The UK’s premier business lobbying organization, the CBI, has called on the business world to “turn up the volume” in the debate about the country’s relationship with Europe. A referendum is expected by 2017 to decide whether or not there should be a British exit (or “Brexit”) from the European Union. But how could this impact the electricity and gas market?

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Canadian oil has its Jean-Paul Sartre moment: hell is a lack of investors

The Canadian oil patch is undergoing an existential moment as low oil prices have scared off investors and thrown the future of further oil sands projects into disarray.

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Offshore revenue sharing debate stalls before it starts

For years, legislative efforts to give coastal states a larger share of offshore drilling revenue have brought the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee “to a standstill,” Washington Senator Maria Cantwell, the committee’s top Democrat said at a hearing last week.

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A tale of two crudes: Nigeria and Angola

Nigeria and Angola,  both situated on the west side of Africa, are two of biggest producers in the region, but the crudes from these two countries have treaded divergent paths in the past year, despite a lot of similarities.

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Holy Carbon: Does the Pope’s view matter in the fight against climate change?

Pope Francis is set to weigh in on the climate change debate in what has already caused a considerable buzz in the media, by equal measure prompting cheers from the green lobby and irritation among climate skeptics, even before the message has been released.

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Could El Niño boost European gas demand this winter?

The strongest year for European gas demand since the 2008 financial crisis was 2010, a year impacted by the El Niño weather phenomenon. With international weather agencies now identifying the signs of the first El Niño conditions since 2010, could this be a sign of a cold winter ahead, and strong gas demand to come? 

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